Nontraditional pastas, like those made from beans, rice, and soy products, have become increasingly popular as a healthier option for pasta fans. However, that doesn’t mean you can load up on veggie noodles with no consequences. “We would be wise to remember that these pastas, while more nutrient dense than traditional white pasta, still have calories and carbohydrates,” says Monica Auslander Moreno, MS, RD, LD/N, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition. “Portions are still set at a measly 1/2 cup cooked; most of us do 2-3 cups of cooked pasta at a time. Try going ‘half and half’ with pasta alternatives and a vegetable pasta substitute.” Check out these weight-loss breakthroughs doctors wish you knew.

After somewhere between three and five hours, your body stops processing its last meal. There's nothing left to absorb, so insulin levels naturally decrease. Then, somewhere between eight and 12 hours after that last meal, your body starts burning stored fat. (Why don't you start burning fat sooner? Biology is sometimes a pain in the ass; it's like our bodies will do anything to hang on to fat.)
Don't get me wrong — exercising at any time is good for you. But evening activity may be particularly beneficial because many people's metabolism slows down toward the end of the day. Thirty minutes of aerobic activity before dinner increases your metabolic rate and may keep it elevated for another two or three hours, even after you've stopped moving. Plus, it'll help you relax post-meal so you won't be tempted by stress-induced grazing that can rack up calories.

You can also lose inches in 30 days. "Just in my own 15 years of experience in working with patients, I have seen some lose up to five to 10 inches in a month from losing four to eight pounds," Jim told POPSUGAR. Keep in mind those five to 10 inches aren't just from your belly; those are full-body measurements from all major areas, including your waist, hips, chest, arms, legs, shoulders, and neck. He added that the inches lost depend on if you are weight training, what kind of cardio you're doing, how much water you're drinking, and how many calories you're eating.
Most low-carb diets advocate replacing carbs with protein and fat, which could have some negative long-term effects on your health. If you do try a low-carb diet, you can reduce your risks and limit your intake of saturated and trans fats by choosing lean meats, fish and vegetarian sources of protein, low-fat dairy products, and eating plenty of leafy green and non-starchy vegetables.
If you drink regular, go to 2%. If you already drink 2%, go down another notch to 1% or skim milk. Each step downward cuts the calories by about 20 percent. Once you train your taste buds to enjoy skim milk, you’ll have cut the calories in the whole milk by about half and trimmed the fat by more than 95 percent. One disclaimer: There are times when fat-free dairy isn’t the best option.
Choose Liquid Calories Wisely. Sweetened drinks pile on the calories, but don't reduce hunger like solid foods do. Satisfy your thirst with water, sparkling water with citrus, skim or low-fat milk, or small portions of 100% fruit juice. Try a glass of nutritious and low-calorie vegetable juice to hold you over if you get hungry between meals. Be careful of alcohol calories, which add up quickly. If you tend to drink a glass or two of wine or a cocktail on most days, limiting alcohol to the weekends can be a huge calorie saver.
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